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Silver Halide Technology

Every original Fujifilm photo paper incorporates our traditional silver halide emulsion technology. The emulsion is embedded in gelatine, providing overall durability of the image layers and protecting them against chemical degradation from atmospheric pollution and physical wear.

The process

When the silver halide crystals in the photographic paper are exposed, a latent image is created by means of an RGB exposure system. The photo paper is then put through a chemical process using a developer and is fixed to create the image on the paper. During this process, the cyan, magenta and yellow dyes are applied in three different layers.

Compare quality with our new tool: the Print Technology Comparison Tool

Our latest innovation – the Print Technology Comparison Tool – compares different print technologies using Original Photo Paper. Thanks to silver halide technology, the image doesn’t show any screen raster or colour dots. It’s a continuous-tone print with uniform colour across each individual pixel, resulting in smooth, natural colour reproduction. Each pixel can be completely filled with one of 16.7 million colours – it’s a real photo print.

Digital press (ElectroInk technology):

This technology uses a regular screen raster to create different colours. The modulation of the colour tone is achieved by using different dot sizes of pure colour toner. At least four different pure colours need to be used: yellow, cyan, magenta and black.

Inkjet technology:

Instead of regular linear screen raster dots, inkjet technology provides a random distribution of pure colour ink dots of cyan, magenta, yellow and black inks. Modern inkjet presses can vary the ink dot size and are able to print quite small dots.

 

Disclaimer: The images shown in the slider display a high-resolution zoom and do not match the original scale of the surfaces.

 

 

To open the Print Technology Comparison Tool please click on one of the images below.

Choose technique (right)
Choose technique (right)
Choose technique (right)